As a design student, I always feel that projects make me too busy for family, friends and breakfast. When the opportunity came for me to create a 70 day iterative experiment, I thought I would try to start changing myself by making time to cook breakfast every morning. Thinking it'd be easy, I decided to cook an egg differently every day. After the common fried, hardboiled, and over-easy options I had to find new methods of cooking, but by day 20, I was out of ideas. I gave up trying to make eggs edible and sought out ways of manipulating its physical form. Instead of going online to find recipes, I asked family and friends for ideas of how I could generate interesting physical forms from an egg. By inviting others to take part in my experiment, I gained inspiration from the variety of cultural backgrounds and creative resources of the people around me. My project taught me that I alone can only achieve so much but a collective imagination can grant access to great ideas.

The highlight was taking my eggs to a biology lab. A friend suggested we crack eggs into liquid nitrogen. As soon as we hit the lab, more biology majors added their own ideas. We spun eggs in a centrifuge, added carcinogens to eggs in petri dishes, and set fire to an egg on the fireproof table with ethanol and a flame. To be honest, my ideas of manipulating eggs ended at day 15. Instead of going online to find recipes, I asked family and friends for ideas of how I could generate interesting physical forms from an egg. By inviting others to take part in my experiment, I gained inspiration from the variety of cultural backgrounds and creative resources of the people around me. This project became an illustration in how designers can facilitate a collective imagination.